Our Process

The Rx Foundation funds innovative projects and people to develop groundbreaking, cost-saving improvements in health care quality and access in the United States. The Rx Foundation supports early-stage initiatives with strong leadership and potential for outsized impact.

The Rx Foundation actively engages with leaders in the field to seek out promising projects, and invites specific institutions and organizations to apply for funding. The foundation does not publish requests for proposals, or consider unsolicited letters of inquiry. Funding exploration is typically a three-step process:

  1. Initial discussion of concepts between potential grant partners and one or more Rx Foundation members.
  2. Invitation to submit a letter of inquiry (LOI), to be circulated and discussed among the full Board.
  3. Invitation to submit a full proposal, to be discussed and voted on by the full Board.

The Rx Foundation makes grants throughout the calendar year.

Typical grants range from $50,000 – $200,000 per year, for one to two years. The Foundation welcomes subsequent proposals toward funding the next steps or new elements of successful projects.

Rx Foundation grant-making PHILOSOPHY

The Rx Foundation typically makes grants to: pilot a novel concept; help a new initiative achieve greater scale; or provide technical assistance (e.g., evaluations or consulting resources) to help an initiative at a formative or crucial stage.

The Rx Foundation looks for proposals that:

  • are directed by a highly promising or proven leader;
  • fill an important health care gap or occupy a new space;
  • foster practical on-the-ground progress;
  • are novel or paradigm-shifting;
  • lend themselves to wide dissemination and use in the field;
  • have potential to achieve scale and financial self-sufficiency;
  • are proposed by an organization that has 501(c)(3) tax status or a qualified Fiscal Sponsor/Agent;
  • might leverage other support;
  • involve indirect costs no greater than 10% of the total budget.

The Rx Foundation typically does not fund projects that:

  • could otherwise receive institutional support;
  • are part of core operating expenses;
  • could be funded by other philanthropic, federal, or private industry sources;
  • fund annual or capital campaigns, scholarships, travel assistance, or conference fees.

 

General Inquiries